Take A Look At These Colorized Black And White Photos That Will Surely Amaze You

Published on 12/19/2020
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In history, there are a lot of moments that deserve another look. We now have the capacity to bring them to life in color, while old pictures were produced in black and white! If you ask us, no justice was done to them by the monochrome scheme at all. We’re glad others thought they were coloring these old pictures. They are lovely to see and will take you down memory lane on a walk. Just a word of warning: for all viewers, some of these photos are not appropriate. Proceeding with caution is a good idea!

Mata Hari Was A True Icon

The magnificent Mata Hari was a spy and dancer who had taken the world by storm. People have called a feminist, a courtesan, a spy wannabee, and more! We know, irrespective of these labels, that her story is hard to replicate. She had no hesitation about jumping into thrilling endeavors, although her undoing also resulted in it. This is what the director and choreographer of the National Ballet, Ted Brandsen, had to say about her: “What fascinated us is the story of a woman with an incredible lust for life and a powerful instinct to survive, and to reinvent herself and to transform herself. She had a lot of horrible things happen to her, and she managed to somehow give a spin to it and find her way out.”

Mata Hari Was A True Icon

Mata Hari Was A True Icon

Stock Market Crash On Black Tuesday

Known as Black Tuesday, when Wall Street traders lost billions of dollars and devastated investors in a single day, the United States of America saw a low point. On October 29, 1929, investors traded less than 16 million shares. It was the last day of the messy six-day whirlwind in which, by buying huge blocks of stock, investment bankers tried to keep the market under control. On this day, prices have collapsed completely. Not only did it empty bank accounts, but it also led to the industrialized world’s demise and ultimately sank the nation into what we now call the Great Depression.

Stock Market Crash On Black Tuesday

Stock Market Crash On Black Tuesday

Giving A Fellow Hollywood Star The Side-Eye

Hollywood frenemies are nothing new! Look at this photo showing Sophia Loren with her head perched beside Jayne Mansfield’s bust. It seemed like a party of sorts crashed into the latter! The reality was that this was taken during a Paramount party supposed to celebrate the arrival of the Italian star on the stateside. It was held in 1957 in Beverly Hills. Sitting beside Clifton Webb, the celebrant was seen bombarded with the assets of her colleague. This was probably a Jayne Mansfield advertising stunt, although the shot caught Loren. She could not tear her eyes away from Mansfield, Loren said. She has always refused to sign prints of this particular photo on top of that.

Giving A Fellow Hollywood Star The Side Eye

Giving A Fellow Hollywood Star The Side Eye

Entering The Jaws Of Death Without A Clue

By storming Normandy’s beaches, soldiers from Canada, England, and the United States changed the tides of the war! A lot of the young men in the service knew that once they entered the fray, they might never return home. Tom Jensen served with the 626th Engineer Light Equipment Company as a sergeant. He told the Chicago Tribune that other troops did not even know their destination before they arrived there. “They didn’t tell us anything we didn’t need to know. Heck, some of the guys on our ship thought we were headed to Japan, not Normandy. Just months earlier, we were either in high school or working odd jobs. We weren’t soldiers, at least not yet,”  the vet said.

Entering The Jaws Of Death Without A Clue

Entering The Jaws Of Death Without A Clue

Marilyn Monroe Is Pretty In Pink

In 1952, Harold Lloyd took this sweet photo of a movie star for Life Magazine. This was the first photo collab, but it wasn’t the last one between the two. A year after that, once again, the two of them worked together. This time, it was for the spread of a swimsuit that was taken out at his estate, Greenacres. Since the estate offered her isolation, which she needed, Marilyn Monroe had a lot of fun with him. “She was my age, or maybe a year or two younger, but we came from very different worlds. She sat down to put on her makeup, and we just started chatting about our lives. She insisted on seeing the baby and talked about how she dreamed of having a child of her own one day,” his daughter said.

Marilyn Monroe Is Pretty In Pink

Marilyn Monroe Is Pretty In Pink

Teenage German Soldier In Distress After His Capture

A photo of the Second World War that is not emotionally charged is hard to look for. Take a glance at this picture of Hans-Georg Henke, a 16-year-old German soldier. It was obtained after the US 9th Army took him prisoner, on April 3, 1945. The year before that, his mother and father apparently died, and the tragedy caused him to join the Luftwaffe to support the rest of the family. The photographer, John Florea, said the boy was crying and in surprise. He was a young child who did feel the very worst of the war, so it’s comprehensible.

Teenage German Soldier In Distress After His Capture

Teenage German Soldier In Distress After His Capture

The Fattest, Shortest, And Tallest Men In Europe

Isn’t it great to see three individuals who are at the upper end of their particular fields? At one stage, these guys were the tallest, tiniest, and heaviest men in Europe. These pictures tell us a great deal about the human race! Isn’t seeing just how significantly different human beings can be extremely interesting? The men are all getting along fine, even after this. This picture was taken back in 1913, more than a century ago!

The Fattest, Shortest, And Tallest Men In Europe

The Fattest, Shortest, And Tallest Men In Europe

Meet Jungle Pam

A lot of people were tempted by Jungle Pam to get into drag racing. It looks as if there’s nothing more effective to bring in fans than a gorgeous bombshell in shorts. She appeared on the scene at the age of 18 after meeting a drag racer in Pennsylvania by the name of Jungle Jim. She left college to go drag racing! A friend of hers was there to teach her the ropes. She did turn out to be a fast learner and went on to be their pit crew’s focal point. We can actually completely see why this was the case, to be reasonable. Have a look at her!

Meet Jungle Pam

Meet Jungle Pam

How The Mona Lisa Survived The Second World War

Is there a painting that’s more internationally known than the Mona Lisa? It had been stolen several times in the past, but it was in the Louver during the Second World War. Jacques Jaujard, the director of France’s National Museums, developed a plan to keep it safe from the Nazis. On 25 August 1939, when the Soviet Union and Germany announced the Non-Aggression Pact, the “Museum for Repairs” was closed for three days. The staff took down all the paintings, the statues moved, and the works of art were left in wooden crates. Using red dots to imply the significance of the pieces, these containers were labeled. After that, hundreds of trucks brought the Loire Valley thousands of artifacts and crates to secure them.

How The Mona Lisa Survived The Second World War

How The Mona Lisa Survived The Second World War

Carl Akeley And The Leopard That Attacked Him

Taxidermy is a pretty neat occupation on its own if you ask us. Even cooler than most is Carl Akeley! During his African safaris, the jack of all trades lived through many encounters with wild animals. He very seriously took his job. Not only did he stuff the skins with whatever it was he had on hand. Instead, to ensure the final products would look lifelike, he studied their bodies. He struggled with a leopard in 1896 when he was hunting for ostriches in Somaliland. It was a survival struggle, and he barely made it alive out of there.

Carl Akeley And The Leopard That Attacked Him

Carl Akeley And The Leopard That Attacked Him

Brigitte Bardot At Her Peak

There had been a moment when the most beautiful woman on the planet was thought to be Brigitte Bardot. The actress left viewers with a spell and made the most of her performances. Back in the ’50s and 60s, she was probably one of the most popular women on Earth. Sadly, her fame made any semblance of anonymity impossible for her to enjoy. She once told The Guardian, “I don’t know what it means to sit quietly in a bistro, on a terrace, or in the theatre without being approached by someone.”

Brigitte Bardot At Her Peak

Brigitte Bardot At Her Peak

Arsenal Goalie Jack Kelsey On A Very Foggy Day

Obtained in 1954, this picture shows Arsenal’s Jack Kelsey glancing into the haze. Commonly, the photo below is wrongly attributed as actually coming from a viral story that dates back to Christmas Day 1937. According to this tale, a game was played on a very foggy day between Chelsea and Stamford Ridge. It was called only 61 minutes into the game, but nobody informed the Stamford Bridge goalie about it.

Arsenal Goalie Jack Kelsey On A Very Foggy Day

Arsenal Goalie Jack Kelsey On A Very Foggy Day

Little Ruby Bridges And Her U.S. Marshal Escorts

Can you believe that in the civil rights movement, a little girl played an important role? The first black student to enter a segregated elementary school in the South was Ruby Bridges. Even though William Frantz Elementary School was just several blocks away from her home in New Orleans, federal marshals needed to escort her to classes for her own safety. Unfortunately, the little girl had to deal on a daily basis with racists. She had to study alone because white parents wanted to pull their children out if she studied with them. She graduated from a desegregated high school more than a decade after that. In 1999, in an effort to support change and tolerance through education, she started the Ruby Bridges Foundation.

Little Ruby Bridges And Her U.S. Marshal Escorts

Little Ruby Bridges And Her U.S. Marshal Escorts

A Utility Worker Delivering The Kiss Of Life

Rocco Morabito took this incredible shot in 1967. Called “The Kiss of Life,” a utility worker called J.D. is shown. Thompson, as he was trying to save Randall G. Champion, his colleague. Moments before this happened, his co-worker made contact with a low-voltage line. He knocked out the poor guy right away. That Thompson was a quick thinker was a good thing! Apparently, when he witnessed this moment, Morabito was cruising down West 26th Street.

A Utility Worker Delivering The Kiss Of Life

A Utility Worker Delivering The Kiss Of Life

A German Soldier In His Dugout During The Great War

Trench warfare was a tremendous part of the Great War. Dating back to the Civil War, the military tactic involves soldiers digging out ditches to provide both defense and last stand. Troops had to go through the narrow trenches in Belgium and northern France and stay there for weeks on end. In reality, the trenches were the victims of the mass casualties of the First World War. These were the troops who had to rise from the ditches to deal with oncoming forces, to be precise. Regrettably for them, what made them sitting ducks for the offensive gunfire was practically a “no man’s land.”

A German Soldier In His Dugout During The Great War

A German Soldier In His Dugout During The Great War

The Gorgeous Elizabeth Taylor While Taping Giant In 1956

Elizabeth Taylor certainly lived an incredible life. She launched her acting career in 1941, but after starring in Giant alongside Rock Hudson and James Dean, she only got her big break in the ’50s. Once, the actress said she didn’t watch her movies but enjoyed the memories she had of making them. “It’s been a long time since I’ve seen Giant. I don’t look at old movies of myself. I don’t even look at new ones of myself. But I loved Jimmy, and I loved Rock. And I was the last person Jimmy was with before he drove to his death…But that was a private, personal moment,” she stated.

The Gorgeous Elizabeth Taylor While Taping Giant In 1956

The Gorgeous Elizabeth Taylor While Taping Giant In 1956

Hawaiian Night Fishing, 1948

What a spectacular photo! Can you imagine how wading out into the water with a live flame over your head must be? When you consider that this man was using a spear for fishing, this is even more amazing. Hawaiians have been using spears when fishing in shallow waters for generations. Strong forests, like koai’e, uhiuhi, o’a, and kauila, are often used. Often they are six to seven feet long and have a pointed end. With the light of the torches, the fishermen drew fish that were made using coconut leaves trapped to their homemade poles. When they needed to make it brighter, they burned the bamboo with nuts.

Hawaiian Night Fishing, 1948

Hawaiian Night Fishing, 1948

Charlie Chaplin And Albert Einstein At The Premiere Of City Lights

When you assumed that Albert Einstein spent his days with fellow scientists, you were wrong! He was an imaginative and funny guy who considered himself an artist. After the head of Universal Studios has introduced them, Carl Laemmle, we can see why he got on famously with Charlie Chaplin. The researcher and comedian went to the premiere of City Lights together in 1931! It is said that Einstein admitted that he was envious of his friend because, without even a single word, the world could understand him. “But your fame is even greater… the world admires you when nobody understands you,” Chaplin replied.

Charlie Chaplin And Albert Einstein At The Premiere Of City Lights

Charlie Chaplin And Albert Einstein At The Premiere Of City Lights

Paratroopers Of Easy Company Chilling At Adolf Hitler’s Home

It looks like the men in the photo had a great time, but it’s even better than you think! The men of Easy Company, taken in 1945, were chilling at the house of Adolf Hitler in the Bavarian Alps. If you’ve seen Band of Brothers, you’ll see in the miniseries this particular scene. Throughout Europe, Hitler amassed many homes, including this one in the Obersalzberg near Berchtesgaden, Bavaria. On the 25th of April 1945, it was bombed. On May 4, only hours just before the French 2nd Armored Division, as well as the U.S. 3rd Infantry Division, entered it through secret tunnels, SS troops set it on fire. By taking the remaining alcohol and looting the home, the Allied men rewarded themselves!

Paratroopers Of Easy Company Chilling At Adolf Hitler's Home

Paratroopers Of Easy Company Chilling At Adolf Hitler’s Home

Vivien Leigh In The Role Of Scarlett O’Hara

Actress Vivien Leigh, even though she was English and no Southern Belle, starred in Gone with the Wind. This role defined her career, at any rate! People found her manic and hard to work with after she got to Los Angeles for the taping. She and her partner, Laurence Olivier, thought back then that the film would flop. He even tried to tell her, “You have got to justify yourself in the next two or 3 films (or even 2 or 3 years) by proving that the presumable failure of Gone W.T.W. was not your fault and you can only do that by being really good in the following parts. To make a success of your career in pictures [is] ESSENTIAL for your self-respect, and our ultimate happiness, therefore. … If you don’t, I am afraid you may become just — well, boring.”

Vivien Leigh In The Role Of Scarlett O'Hara

Vivien Leigh In The Role Of Scarlett O’Hara

Lawrence Of Arabia In Real Life

During the Great War, Colonel Thomas Edward Lawrence discovered himself in an unlikely position. He had been a British demolition artist who did work to handle secluded depots and bridges of the Ottoman Empire with Arab rebel allies. Yes, he was the basis of Arabia’s Lawrence! According to him, he had attacked 79 railway bridges, so that they needed to be demolished and rebuilt. He damaged the railroads so badly, and some of these ruins can still be seen. Instead of making an effort to tear them down, the Turkish military decided to abandon some of the rubble!

Lawrence Of Arabia In Real Life

Lawrence Of Arabia In Real Life

The Smallest Man And His Huge Pet Cat

What a brilliant photo! Henry Behrens was only 30 inches tall, which made him the smallest man on the planet when he was still alive. He only weighed 32 pounds or so on top of that. He joined the Burton Lester Small People’s Troupe and traveled the world with his crew. We are glad that he did not mind and even enjoyed the attention. Just check out this adorable picture of him dancing in 1956 with his cat!

The Smallest Man And His Huge Pet Cat

The Smallest Man And His Huge Pet Cat

Japanese-Americans Were Relocated To Internment Camps

The American military imposed restrictions on Japanese Americans after Pearl Harbor. They have been pressured into internment camps that were nothing more than prisons to be glorified. The truth was that since civilians did not pose threats, there was no reason for the military to do such a thing. In the one near Death Valley, Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga talked about her experience.“The only thing that was in the ‘apartments’ when we got there were army metal beds with the springs on it, and a potbellied stove in the middle of the room. That was the only thing. No chest of drawers, no nothing, no curtains on the windows. It was the barest of the bare,” she said. This Japanese-American student photograph was taken in 1942.

Japanese Americans Were Relocated To Internment Camps

Japanese-Americans Were Relocated To Internment Camps

Lyndon B. Johnson Was Sworn Into Office Aboard Air Force One

When John F. Kennedy was assassinated, the United States had no president for around an hour and a half. VPOTUS Lyndon B. Johnson was sworn into office aboard Air Force One while it was parked at Love Field in Dallas as the entire country was in a state of confusion and chaos. You’ll find First Ladies Jacqueline Kennedy and Lady Bird Johnson on his left. Agents from the FBI and his new cabinet members are watching. The facial expressions they all wore show us how much tension and anxiety there was in the air.

Lyndon B. Johnson Was Sworn Into Office Aboard Air Force One

Lyndon B. Johnson Was Sworn Into Office Aboard Air Force One

A Japanese Military Commander In Traditional Armor

Felice Beato shot this photo in 1863. The photographer hand-colored it in the original iteration! In the studio, he enjoyed taking full-length portraits so he could concentrate on traditional costumes and cultural traditions that intrigued him. His pictures of Japan came with vignetting at the borders that made them appear more pictorial. Koboto Santaro, a military commander, was the subject in this particular photo. We don’t know what’s in his hand, but we’d still be able to keep our distance from him!

A Japanese Military Commander In Traditional Armor

A Japanese Military Commander In Traditional Armor

Sally Field As Gidget

By trying to play a surfer girl who often misbehaved at Gidget, the gorgeous Sally Field got her big break in 1965. She was 18 years old at the time. “After the first night of my workshop, a casting guy asked me if I had an agent. I didn’t, but I still went in for an interview. The waiting room was filled with girls who looked like movie stars. They all had professional headshots; the only pictures I had were wallet photos of me with my friends. At my screen test, I walked in and said, ‘Which one is the camera?’ The crew members were like, ‘Oh, boy.’ But the casting director said, ‘You’re it.’ God was looking out for me. He thought he’d throw me in the ocean and see if I could swim,” the actress shared.

Sally Field As Gidget

Sally Field As Gidget

The Red Army Liberated The Auschwitz-Birkenau

On January 27, 1945, when the Soviet Army did arrive at Auschwitz, they discovered a warehouse storing victims’ possessions. Pans, pots, eyeglasses, prosthetic limbs, and shoes were found. They assumed, at first, that the camp had been forgotten. They quickly figured out that what the Nazis left to do when they ran for it was full of sick and starving people. Georgii Elisavetskii was one of the first soldiers to go into the camp. He said, “They rushed toward us shouting, fell on their knees, kissed the flaps of our overcoats, and threw their arms around our legs.”

The Red Army Liberated The Auschwitz Birkenau

The Red Army Liberated The Auschwitz-Birkenau

Oregon Man Thomas Cave With His Social Security Number Tattoo

One of the legions of people who passed through difficult times at the height of the Great Depression was Thomas Cave and his wife, Annie. The photographer, Dorothea Lange, said that the couple worked directly for a whole year to bring home $550, which would be $10,000 in today’s currency. They rented a small flat that cost them $12 a month, just to find themselves out of work. Just four months before he got his 1937 tattoo, the Social Security Act was launched. For individuals who opted in and received a social security number, this act offered relief. To ensure that he would never forget it, Cave got the number tattooed on his arm! At the time, he was not the only individual to do this.

Oregon Man Thomas Cave With His Social Security Number Tattoo

Oregon Man Thomas Cave With His Social Security Number Tattoo

The Effervescent Sophia Loren

Did you guys know that when she made her debut in Quo Vadis in 1951, Sophia Loren was just 17 years old? Since then, she has appeared over the years in many projects. There was a period when she was asked what, if any, she would do differently. She just said, “In a long, long career like I had—and by the way, I have—it’s very difficult to be able to criticize some of the moments that you do by yourself that you never tell to other people. It’s a very normal thing to do because you cannot every time have a big victory – no, there have been moments, maybe weak moments, where you did something that you are not really very happy about.”

The Effervescent Sophia Loren

The Effervescent Sophia Loren

A Soldier Heading Home After The War

Ernst Haas toed the line between a photojournalist and an artist over the four decades of his photography career. After the Second World War, he infused artistry into his pictures of soldiers heading home. He demonstrated the despair and confusion in Europe back then in a photo essay called “Homecoming,” as people looked for their relatives among the survivors. It was a good collection that helped him achieve more success. He turned down all of them! “What I want is to stay free so that I can carry out my ideas… I don’t think there are many editors who could give me the assignments I give myself,” he said.

A Soldier Heading Home After The War

A Soldier Heading Home After The War

After The Engagement Of John F. Kennedy And Jackie Bouvier

Jackie Bouvier and John F. Kennedy moved to Cape Cod’s Kennedy family home after their engagement. They were accompanied by a reporter who was taking photos of their engagement. There was even an entire issue of Life Magazine that showed their engagement photos exclusively! The July 20 issue headline read, “Senator Kennedy Goes A-Courting.” Taking a glance at those moments, Jackie shared, “Now, I think that I should have known that he was magic all along. I did know it — but I should have guessed that it would be too much to ask to grow old with and see our children grow up together. So now, he is a legend when he would have preferred to be a man.”

After The Engagement Of John F. Kennedy And Jackie Bouvier

After The Engagement Of John F. Kennedy And Jackie Bouvier

A Civil War Veteran In Pennsylvania

Is it strange to think that in the 20th century, Civil War vets were still around? After most of them were revealed to have passed away in 1956. The reality, however, is that back then, there were probably several more around. If they could follow orders and hold a gun, young men had no option but to enter the battle. After serving in the bloodiest battle on American soil, plenty of them still had their futures ahead of them. We are confident that the youngsters had plenty of stories to tell. In 1935, this photo was taken.

A Civil War Veteran In Pennsylvania

A Civil War Veteran In Pennsylvania

Cornet Winston Churchill In The 4th Queen’s Hussar’s Cavalry

For his commitment to his country, Winston Churchill is mainly remembered. He was part of the 4th Queen’s Hussar’s Calvary as a young man and served during the “the august, unchallenged and tranquil glories of the Victorian Era.” He divided his time back then between seven months of summer training and then extended leave for the rest. During his leave, he set off for Cuba in 1895 to go on an adventure! He was sent with the rest of the regiment to India after that. When this photo was taken in 1895, he was 21 years old.

Cornet Winston Churchill In The 4th Queen's Hussar's Cavalry

Cornet Winston Churchill In The 4th Queen’s Hussar’s Cavalry

The Real Albert Einstein

People seem to think that Albert Einstein, in an ivory tower, was a genius. This was really not the scenario! He considered himself as an artist who, as his medium, utilized science. To arrive at his theories, he merged inspiration, imagination, as well as knowledge. He spoke to the Saturday Evening Post in 1929 and said, “I believe in intuitions and inspirations. I sometimes feel that I am right. I do not know that I am… [but] I would have been surprised if I had been wrong… I am enough of the artist to draw freely upon my imagination. Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.”

The Real Albert Einstein

The Real Albert Einstein

Hitchhiking Was Common In The ’60s And ’70s

People relied on hitchhiking in the ’70s to make their way across the nation. It was a little risky, but the idea of the liberty that happened to come with it seduced young folks. Since the dawn of time, the truth is that people have always hitchhiked. In the ’70s, however, it only became more mainstream. Back then, these young men laid their lives behind the wheels in the hands of strangers. However, this has become much less common. There are still people hitchhiking, but not quite as often as before.

Hitchhiking Was Common In The '60s And '70s

Hitchhiking Was Common In The ’60s And ’70s

Geologist Thomas Griffith Taylor And Meteorologist Charles Wright Beside An Iceberg

People watched in awe at the turn of the century as explorers took over the Arctic. People were competing to be the first individual to get to the South Pole! The Terra Nova Expedition was launched by a British explorer called Robert Falcon Scott in 1911 to do just that. The party has gone through extreme conditions as they went on this “pole hunt.” They finally arrived on January 16, 1912, after almost a year. The sad truth of the tale was that there was a flag there already! Norway’s Roald Amundsen defeat them by a month.

Geologist Thomas Griffith Taylor And Meteorologist Charles Wright Beside An Iceberg

Geologist Thomas Griffith Taylor And Meteorologist Charles Wright Beside An Iceberg

Charlie Chaplin When He Was 27 Years Old

Do you even know what it looked like when Charlie Chaplin wasn’t dressed like a Tramp? The reality is he wasn’t like an unfortunate man in a bowler’s hat! As the child of a failing actress, he was raised in poverty. He took the stage as well and then immigrated to the United States from London! It didn’t take him long before he got his start across the pond for himself. He based the Tramp on his dad’s memories. “It was just released whole from somewhere deep within my father. It was really my father’s alter ego, the little boy who never grew up: ragged, cold, hungry, but still thumbing his nose at the world,” he said.

Charlie Chaplin When He Was 27 Years Old

Charlie Chaplin When He Was 27 Years Old

The Seaforth Highlanders With A Dog In Their French Trench

During the Great War, which was unsurpassed in its brutality and carnage, Europe worked hard to destroy the Central Powers! Soldiers from all around the world, even though they were severely underprepared, went into massive battles. The Seaforth Highlanders of Scotland, formed in 1881, stepped forward to fight the fascists. After the 78th Highlanders and the 72nd Highlanders merger, it became known as the county regiment for various northern Scottish counties. Originally, the men served in India but then were reassigned to France to join the Givenchy Battle in 1914. They were transferred to Palestine and Iraq later on.

The Seaforth Highlanders With A Dog In Their French Trench

The Seaforth Highlanders With A Dog In Their French Trench

Salvador Dali Aboard The S.S. Normandie In New York City

Salvador Dali was indeed an artist who did not show up to blend any place or era flawlessly. Despite this, during the early 20th century, his surrealist paintings and experiments turned heads! He was inspired by his early New York City trips, among other things. When he first went to visit the Big Apple, he and his wife took Franc’s Champlain and had to stay close to the machine rooms on one of the lower decks. According to Patroness Caresse Crosby, he only said, “I am next to the engine so that I’ll get there quicker.”

Salvador Dali Aboard The S.S. Normandie In New York City

Salvador Dali Aboard The S.S. Normandie In New York City

A Young Woman Called Eunice Hancock With A Compressed-Air Grinder In An Aircraft Plant

During the Second World War, men were forced to join in the battle against Germany and Japan. To fill in the gap they left in the job market, women decided to take on employment in utilities, transportation, and manufacturing! Nearly 2 million women worked for the war effort in plants and on assembly lines to make weapons and machine pieces. At the time, the number of working women jumped from 27 to 37 percent! These females were just as important as the men were to the war effort.

A Young Woman Called Eunice Hancock With A Compressed Air Grinder In An Aircraft Plant

A Young Woman Called Eunice Hancock With A Compressed Air Grinder In An Aircraft Plant

Pablo Picasso With Gifts From Gary Cooper In 1958

Can it be any cooler with his hat and revolver than this photo of Pablo Picasso? The artist enjoyed hosting guests and making friends with people from various backgrounds. He was a colleague of Gertrude Stein, Julio Gonzalez, and Andre Salmon, for instance. At some point in time, these individuals all lived in Paris. Picasso was close to Gary Cooper, aside from them! They were even close enough in the ’50s that the artist amused the actor as well as his family in Vallauris at his very own ceramics worship.

Pablo Picasso With Gifts From Gary Cooper In 1958

Pablo Picasso With Gifts From Gary Cooper In 1958

A Leading Stoker Called Popeye Who Was On The HMS Rodney

The guy in the picture is Popeye the Sailor Man’s spitting image! It did turn out E.C. Segar received inspiration from a man in his hometown for the cartoon character. That wasn’t the same guy, however. The picture showed a man on HMS Rodney in 1940. The weird thing, though, is that the Imperial War Museum said he was nicknamed “Popeye.” However, don’t get too excited. Let us inform you that Rodney’s HMS was a British vessel, while Segar grew up in Illinois.

A Leading Stoker Called Popeye Who Was On The HMS Rodney

A Leading Stoker Called Popeye Who Was On The HMS Rodney

The Reunion Of Two German Brothers After The Border Pass Agreement

Take a gander at this extraordinary picture of two brothers from Germany. No one could pass the frontier when the Berlin Wall was erected in 1961. Until a border pass contract was passed in 1963, this remained true. This made it possible for individuals to cross from West Berlin to the city’s eastern side. This was not the right solution, although it did not offer relief to those who felt helpless. Some individuals couldn’t see their family at all for two years. 25 years after this, the wall finally collapsed.

The Reunion Of Two German Brothers After The Border Pass Agreement

The Reunion Of Two German Brothers After The Border Pass Agreement

Mata Hari Blew The French Firing Squad A Kiss

There was such a wonderful story about Mata Hari that we want to show her to you once again. She was a dancer who, during the Great War, became a spy. In her pursuits, this woman combined espionage and sexuality. She was already gifted at impersonation before she made it big. Early on, despite using the Eastern style of dancing, she masqueraded as Lady MacLeod, an English lord’s child. It didn’t last very long, although her spy days are iconic. In the end, she died on the 15th of October 1917 at the hands of a firing squad. She apparently didn’t wear a blindfold and kissed the guys before they took her life.

Mata Hari Blew The French Firing Squad A Kiss

Mata Hari Blew The French Firing Squad A Kiss

Photographers Used Backdrops To Hide The Devastation In Warsaw

Europe was in shambles after the Second World War, no matter which side they fought for. Poland has also experienced a lot of widespread destruction. The nation used to boast magnificent structures, but so many of them were wrecked to bits. It was not easy to do so, but the survivors wanted to go back to their old lives. Photographers were trying to help citizens gain back some semblance of a normal life, pretending that nothing had started happening. With the support of backdrops like this one, they did so! Seeing the contrast is amazing.

Photographers Used Backdrops To Hide The Devastation In Warsaw

Photographers Used Backdrops To Hide The Devastation In Warsaw

American Soldiers Look At The Tricolor Flag Flying From The Eiffel Tower Again

The Nazis occupied Paris for four years. Finally, on the 25th of August 1944, it was liberated. After the arrival of the U.S. 4th Infantry Division and the French 2nd Armored Division, the Nazis did not put up a fight. Legend has it that Hitler asked general Dietrich von Choltitz to burn the City of Lights and demolish the Eiffel Tower. He just surrendered instead of destroying the beautiful city. A liberation march through the Champs d’Elysees was held two days later to celebrate.

American Soldiers Look At The Tricolor Flag Flying From The Eiffel Tower Again

American Soldiers Look At The Tricolor Flag Flying From The Eiffel Tower Again

Men Of The 1st Infantry Division Leaving England For Normandy On D-Day

The Normandy Battle was a difficult battle that lasted from June 1944 until August 1944. The parties duked it out for Western Europe, and for the soldiers, it was not a walk in the park at all. We doubt that the 156,000 soldiers from the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom knew that the fighting would go on for almost a month! It started on the 6th of June but was meant to start a day earlier. Due to bad weather, they had to delay the operation. Dwight Eisenhower told the brave troops, “You are about to embark upon the Great Crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you.”

Men Of The 1st Infantry Division Leaving England For Normandy On D Day

Men Of The 1st Infantry Division Leaving England For Normandy On D Day

Crow Native Americans Observing The Rodeo At The Crow Fair

In 1904, the Crow Fair began! It is basically a massive family reunion for the Crow Nation as it helps bring all the Native American tribes into the Great Plains. A gathering of tens of thousands of people! It occurs close to Billings, Montana, in the third week of August. It is quite comparable to a county fair but was integrated with the tradition of Native America. The rodeo ended up taking place on a regular basis and showcased professional bull and horse riders and youth events. You should check it out if you ever get the opportunity.

Crow Native Americans Observing The Rodeo At The Crow Fair

Crow Native Americans Observing The Rodeo At The Crow Fair

Drought Refugee From Missouri Waiting For Orange-Picking In California

Following the devastation of their homes, the Dust Bowl had Americans running to the Pacific Coast to seek seasonal jobs. It was considered that these good, hard-working Americans were intruders who arranged to leech off the government. At the moment, California was already searching for crop hands, but the residents did not welcome them. During the Great Depression, this took place, so everybody was down on their luck. Many immigrants were poor, but the fortunate ones managed to land jobs with little pay for picking veggies and fruits.

Drought Refugee From Missouri Waiting For Orange Picking In California

Drought Refugee From Missouri Waiting For Orange Picking In California

Dutch Resistance Fighters On The Streets Of Breda After Its Liberation

The human race was stunned when at the beginning of the Second World War, Germany invaded Europe. The Nazis decided to move far faster and more brutally than anyone believed they would. To help liberate their countries, resistance fighters from various parts of the continent banded together. By trying to offer counterintelligence, communications, as well as domestic sabotage, the Dutch resistance operated with allies. The South was liberated in 1944. It took eight more months to reclaim the north, however.

Dutch Resistance Fighters On The Streets Of Breda After Its Liberation

Dutch Resistance Fighters On The Streets Of Breda After Its Liberation

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